Our People » John Mulvihill



Office: AD3-027,
Analog Devices Building,
University of Limerick

+353 61 237719

john.mulvihill@ul.ie

Qualifications

B.Sc. Mechanical Engineer(University of Limerick),
Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering

Research and Teaching Interests

The mechanical and structural role of meninges in concussion
Nanoparticle characterisation and measurement across the BBB in vitro
Mechanical characterisation of urological and gastrointestinal tissue

John Mulvihill

John received qualifications in Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering from the University of Limerick. During his postgraduate research, he investigated the mechanical, structural, and biological properties of atherosclerotic disease as part of the CABER group in UL.  During this time, John worked on a number of commercialisation projects for minimally invasive cardiovascular and urological devices.  After receiving his Ph.D., he continued his cardiovascular and device design research at Trinity College Dublin (TCD) as part of the FP7 funded AMCARE project to develop a catheter to deliver stem cells to the heart.  In 2014, John was successfully awarded a co-funded postdoctoral fellowship from Marie Curie Actions and Irish Research Council to carry out research in the area of cell mechanobiology in glaucoma at the Ross Ethier lab in Georgia Institute of Technology, United States.  In 2016, John returned to the University of Limerick as Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering, where he co-founded the BioSciBER group.  Within this BioSciBER group, part of the Bernal Institute, John began his research into the mechanics and cell mechanobiology of cortical diseases such as concussion and astrocytoma.

Additional Links

• LinkedIn Profile
• Google Scholar Publications
• Researchgate


Mulvihill, J.J., Cunnane, E.M., McHugh, S.M., Kavanagh, E.G., Walsh, S.R., Walsh, M.T. Mechanical, biological and structural characterization of in vitro ruptured human carotid plaque tissue (2013) Acta Biomaterialia, 9 (11), pp. 9027-9035.
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Development of a Platform for Studying 3D Astrocyte Mechanobiology: Compression of Astrocytes in Collagen Gels
• View Journal Article